Felsenkirche

Idar-Oberstein · Naheland

Attention: The church is unfortunately closed, as extensive rock protection work has to be carried out!  The Felsenkirche in Idar-Oberstein is located high up in an exposed position and can be seen from afar. The legend of the construction of the Felsenkirche is probably one of the best-known myths in the area between the Moselle, Palatinate, Rhine and Saar rivers.

Around the middle of the 11th century, the brothers Wyrich and Emich von Oberstein lived at Bosselstein Castle. Both were in love with Bertha von Lichtenburg. When Wyrich learned of his younger brother's engagement to her, he threw Emich out of the castle window. Wyrich confessed his guilt to an abbot, and as atonement he was to build a chapel with his own hands on the spot where his brother had died. When the construction was completed, Wyrich asked God for a sign of forgiveness. A spring sprang from the rock, which still flows today. At the consecration of the chapel, Wyrich sank down dead at the altar before the abbot. The church was built between 1482 and 1484 on the foundations of an older cave castle by order of Wirich IV of Daun-Oberstein. A rock face and Bosselstein Castle rise above the church. Below lie the houses of the Oberstein district. Today the Felsenkirche belongs to the Protestant congregation. To enter the interior of the church, you have to go through a tunnel cut into the rock in 1980/81, which leads up about 50 steps. Please note that the Felsenkirche is closed to visitors during wedding ceremonies. Services are held every third Sunday of the month at 10.00 am from May to October (subject to change).

Dogs on leash are allowed

Felsenkirche


Dear visitors, dear guests, unfortunately it is currently not possible to visit the Felsenkirche: In order to preserve our extraordinary landmark for the future, it must remain closed due to extensive slope stabilization. A detailed examination of the substance of the rock has revealed this necessity in order to be able to guarantee all visitors the necessary safety in the future.